MIL-STD-810G

METHOD 500.5
LOW PRESSURE (ALTITUDE)

Use low pressure (altitude) tests to determine if materiel can withstand and/or operate in a low pressure environment and/or withstand rapid pressure changes.

Procedure I - Storage/Air Transport
Procedure I is appropriate if the materiel is to be transported or stored at high ground elevations or transported by air in its shipping/storage configuration. Evaluate the materiel with respect to known effects of low pressure (paragraph 2.1.1) and the LCEP (Part One, paragraph 4.2.2.3.1) to determine if this procedure is appropriate.

Procedure II - Operation/Air Carriage

Use Procedure II to determine the performance of the materiel under low pressure conditions. It may be preceded by Procedure I. If there are no low pressure storage, rapid, or explosive decompression requirements, this procedure can stand alone.

Procedure III - Rapid Decompression

Use Procedure III to determine if a rapid decrease in pressure of the surrounding environment will cause a materiel reaction that would endanger nearby personnel or the platform (ground vehicle or aircraft) in which it is being transported. This procedure may be preceded by either the storage or the operational test.

Procedure IV - Explosive Decompression

Procedure IV is similar to Procedure III except that it involves an "instantaneous" decrease in the pressure of the surrounding environment. NOTE: This procedure is more appropriate for items such as sealed cockpit equipment whose failure could endanger cockpit personnel. Since one purpose of this test is to ensure failure of the materiel does not endanger personnel, and a catastrophic failure severe enough to cause an explosive decompression of the cargo compartment would, most likely, bring down the aircraft, carefully consider the appropriateness of application of this procedure for large cargo items.

METHOD 501.5
HIGH TEMPERATURE
Use high temperature tests to obtain data to help evaluate effects of high temperature conditions on materiel safety, integrity, and performance

Procedure I - Storage

Use Procedure I to investigate how high temperatures during storage affect the materiel (integrity of materials, and safety/performance of the materiel). This test procedure includes exposing the test item to high temperatures (and low humidity where applicable) that may be encountered in the materiel's storage situation, followed by an operational test at controlled or high temperature ambient conditions. For materiel inside an enclosure that is, in turn, exposed to solar heating, consider using Method 505.5, Procedure I to determine the actual level of heating of the test materiel caused by solar loading.

Procedure II - Operation

Use Procedure II to investigate how high ambient temperatures may affect materiel performance while it is operating. There are two ways to perform Procedure II:
(1) Expose the test item to cyclic chamber conditions with the test item operating either continuously or during the period of maximum response (highest item temperature).
(2) Expose the test item to a constant temperature and operate the test item when its temperature stabilizes.(To be used only for items situated in close proximity to heat-producing equipment or when it is necessary to verify operation of an item at a specified constant temperature.)

Procedure III - Tactical-Standby to Operational
This procedure is not a substitute for solar radiation (Method 505.5). This procedure evaluates the materiel’s performance at the operating temperatures after being presoaked at non-operational temperatures. Since actinic effects and directional heating are not applicable in this method, consider applying this procedure when materiel is in an enclosed environment,(e.g., aircraft and ground vehicles with closed transparent or translucent areas can develop high internal temperatures prior to equipment operation due to solar heating; enclosures such as communications shelters may require immediate operation after being exposed to solar heating). These are not items in storage or transit situation, but rather items in the operational configuration (ready-to-go as needed) that must be operational in a relatively short period of time. Usually, the “cooling” option refers to merely opening the enclosed areas and allowing the ambient air to begin cooling the interior areas so normal operation can begin.

METHOD 502.5
LOW TEMPERATURE

Use low temperature tests to obtain data to help evaluate effects of low temperature conditions on materiel safety, integrity, and performance during storage, operation, and manipulation.

Procedure I - Storage

Use Procedure I to investigate how low temperatures during storage affect materiel safety during and after storage, and performance after storage.

Procedure II - Operation

Use Procedure II to investigate how well the materiel operates in low temperature environments. For the purpose of this document, operation is defined as excitation of the materiel with a minimum of contact by personnel. It does not exclude handling (manipulation).

Procedure III - Manipulation
Use Procedure III to investigate the ease with which the materiel can be set up and disassembled by personnel wearing heavy, cold-weather clothing.

METHOD 503.5 TEMPERATURE SHOCK

Use the temperature shock test to determine if materiel can withstand sudden changes in the temperature of the surrounding atmosphere without experiencing physical damage or deterioration in performance. For the purpose of this document, "sudden changes" is defined as "an air temperature change greater than 10°C (18°F) within one minute."

METHOD 504.1 CONTAMINATION BY FLUIDS

Use contamination by fluids tests to determine if materiel (or material samples) is affected by temporary exposure to contaminating fluids (liquids) such as may be encountered and applied during its life cycle, either occasionally, intermittently, or over extended periods.


Procedure I - Large System
This procedure covers materiel such as aircraft systems, full-up wheeled and track vehicles, and water craft, to name a few, where operational temperatures may be critical. Possible variations are given below in paragraph 4.5.5(Step 3a-c). The most significant parameters used in this test procedure are the fluid(s) to be used, the temperature, and the duration of exposure. It is also important to specify the operational configuration of the test item, as well as whether or not the test item is heat dissipating during operation.

Procedure II - Small System
This procedure addresses the chemical compatibility of nonmetallic materials used in small arms systems, clothing, boots, gas masks, gloves, Less Than Lethal and other ammunition, binoculars, flashlights, small arms tripods, and other materiel. Testing is performed at standard ambient conditions (see Part One, paragraph 5.1), but this procedure is more tailorable in that the immersion times and item/solution temperatures can be changed to suit the test program.

METHOD 505.5
SOLAR RADIATION (SUNSHINE)

This method has two purposes:
a. To determine the heating effects of direct solar radiation on materiel.
b. To help identify the actinic (photodegradation) effects of direct solar radiation.

Procedure I - Cycling (heating and/or minimal actinic effects)

Use Procedure I to investigate response temperatures when materiel is exposed in the open in realistically hot climates, and is expected to perform without degradation during and after exposure. Although Procedure I can be performed using simple heat-generating lamps (providing the guidance in paragraph 4.1.2 is followed), limited evaluation of actinic effects is possible if full spectrum lamps are used instead. It is preferable to use the solar radiation test (as opposed to the High Temperature test, Method 501.5) when the materiel could be affected by differential heating (see paragraph 2.1.1.1) or when the levels or mechanisms of heating caused by solar radiation are unknown (this encompasses almost all materiel).

Procedure II - Steady State (actinic effects)

Use Procedure II to investigate the effects on materiel of long periods of exposure to sunshine. Actinic effects usually do not occur until materiel surfaces receive large amounts of sunlight (as well as heat and moisture). Therefore, it is inefficient to use the repeated, long cycles of normal levels of solar radiation (as in Procedure I) to generate actinic effects. Using Procedure I for this purpose could take months. The approach, therefore, is to use an accelerated test that is designed to reduce the time to reproduce cumulative effects of long periods of exposure. The 4-hour "lights-off" period of each 24-hour cycle allows for test item conditions (physical and chemical) to return toward "normal" and provide some degree of thermal stress exercising. The key to using Procedure II successfully is maintaining enough cooling air to prevent the test item from exceeding peak response temperatures that would be attained under natural conditions or Procedure I.

METHOD 506.5
RAIN

The purpose of this method is to help determine the following with respect to rain, water spray, or dripping water:
a.The effectiveness of protective covers, cases, and seals in preventing the penetration of water into the materiel.
b.The capability of the materiel to satisfy its performance requirements during and after exposure to water.
c.Any physical deterioration of the materiel caused by the rain.
d.The effectiveness of any water removal system.
e.The effectiveness of protection offered to a packaged materiel.

Procedure I - Rain and Blowing Rain

Procedure I is applicable for materiel that will be deployed out-of-doors and which will be unprotected from rain or blowing rain. The accompanying wind velocity can vary from almost calm to extremely high. Consider using Procedure II for materiel that cannot be adequately tested with this procedure because of its (large) size.

Procedure II - Exaggerated

Consider Procedure II when large (shelter-size) materiel is to be tested and a blowing-rain facility is not available or practical. This procedure is not intended to simulate natural rainfall but will provide a high degree of confidence in the watertightness of materiel.

Procedure III - Drip

Procedure III is appropriate when materiel is normally protected from rain but may be exposed to falling water from condensation or leakage from upper surfaces. There are two variations to the drip test: (1) for materiel that may experience falling water (generally from condensation), and (2) for materiel that may be subjected to heavy condensation or leaks from above.

METHOD 507.5
HUMIDITY

The purpose of this method is to determine the resistance of materiel to the effects of a warm, humid atmosphere.

Procedure I - Induced (Storage & Transit) and Natural and Cycles

Once a cycle is selected, perform the storage & transit portion first, followed by the corresponding natural environment portion of the cycle. Procedure I includes:
(1) three unique cycles that represent conditions that may occur during storage or transit, as well as
(2) three unique natural environment cycles that are performed on test items that are open to the environment.

Procedure II - Aggravated
Procedure II exposes the test item to more extreme temperature and humidity levels than those found in nature (without contributing degrading elements), but for shorter durations. Its advantage is that itproduces results quickly, i.e., it may, generally, exhibit temperature-humidity effects sooner than in the natural or induced procedures. Its disadvantage is that the effects may not accurately represent those that will be encountered in actual service. Be careful when interpreting results. This procedure is used to identify potential problem areas, and the test levels are fixed.

METHOD 508.6
FUNGUS
The purpose of this fungus test is to assess the extent to which materiel will support fungal growth and how any fungal growth may affect performance or use of the materiel. The primary objectives of the fungus test are to determine:

a.if the materials comprising the materiel, or the assembled combination of same, will support fungal growth, and if so, of what species.
b.how rapidly fungus will grow on the materiel.
c.how fungus affects the materiel, its mission, and its safety for use following the growth of fungus on the materiel.
d.if the materiel can be stored effectively in a field environment.
e.if there are simple reversal processes, e.g., wiping off fungal growth.
2.2.1 Test duration:
Twenty-eight days is the minimum test period to allow for fungus germination, breakdown of carbon-containing molecules, and degradation of material. Since indirect effects and physical interference are not likely to occur in the relatively short time frame of the fungus test, consider extension of the exposure period up to 84 days if a greater degree of certainty (less risk) is required in determining the existence or effect of fungus growth.

METHOD 509.5
SALT FOG

The salt fog method is performed to determine the effectiveness of protective coatings and finishes on materials. It may also be applied to determine the effects of salt deposits on the physical and electrical aspects of materiel.

METHOD 510.5
SAND AND DUST

a. Dust (< 150μm) procedure. This test is performed to help evaluate the ability of materiel to resist the effects of dust that may obstruct openings, penetrate into cracks, crevices, bearings, and joints, and to evaluate the effectiveness of filters.
b. Sand (150 to 850μm particle size) procedure. This test is performed to help evaluate the ability of materiel to be stored and operated in blowing sand conditions without degrading performance, effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability due to abrasion (erosion) or clogging effects of large, sharp-edged particles.

Procedure I - Blowing Dust

Determine if:
a. Dust has penetrated the test item in sufficient quantity to cause binding, clogging, seizure or blocking of moving parts, non-operation contacts or relays, or the formation of electrically conductive bridges with resulting shorts.
b. Air filters are not preventing airflow to the test item, and functional performance is within the specified requirements/tolerances.
c. Abrasion of the test item exceeds the specified levels.

Procedure II - Blowing Sand

a. Abrasion of the test item exceeds the specified requirements.
b. The test item operates as required.
c. Protective coatings and seals were compromised.

METHOD 511.5
EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERE

The explosive atmosphere test is performed to:
a.demonstrate the ability of materiel to operate in fuel-air explosive atmospheres without causing ignition, or
b.demonstrate that an explosive or burning reaction occurring within encased materiel will be contained, and will not propagate outside the test item.

Procedure I - Explosive Atmosphere

This procedure is applicable to all types of sealed and unsealed materiel. This test evaluates the ability of the test item to be operated in a fuel vapor environment without igniting the environment.

Procedure II - Explosion Containment

This procedure is used to determine the ability of the test item's case or other enclosures to contain an explosion or flame that is a result of an internal materiel malfunction.

METHOD 512.5 IMMERSION

The immersion test is performed to determine if materiel can withstand immersion or partial immersion in water (e.g., fording), and operate as required during or following immersion.

METHOD 513.6 ACCELERATION

The acceleration test is performed to assure that materiel can structurally withstand the steady state inertia loads that are induced by platform acceleration, deceleration, and maneuver in the service environment, and function without degradation during and following exposure to these forces. Acceleration tests are also used to assure that materiel does not become hazardous after exposure to crash inertia loads.

Procedure I - Structural Test

Procedure I is used to demonstrate that materiel will structurally withstand the loads induced by in-service accelerations.

Procedure II - Operational Test

Procedure II is used to demonstrate that materiel will operate without degradation during and after being subjected to loads induced by in-service acceleration.

Procedure III - Crash Hazard Acceleration Test

Procedure III is used to disclose structural failures of materiel that may present a hazard to personnel during or after a crash. This test is intended to verify that materiel mounting and/or restraining devices will not fail and that sub-elements are not ejected during a crash. Use for materiel mounted in flight occupied areas and/or that could block aircrew/passenger egress or rescue personnel ingress after a crash. The crash hazard can be evaluated by a static acceleration test (Method 513 Procedure II) and/or transient shock (Method 516 Procedure V). The requirement for one or both procedures must be evaluated based on the test item.


METHOD 514.6
VIBRATION

Procedure I - General Vibration
Use Procedure I for materiel to be transported as secured cargo or deployed for use on a vehicle. This procedure applies to ground vehicles as well as fixed and rotary wing aircraft. For this procedure, the test item is secured to a vibration exciter, and vibration is applied to the test item as an input at the fixture/test item interface. Steady state or transient vibration may be applied as appropriate.

Procedure II - Loose Cargo Transportation

Use this procedure for materiel to be carried in/on trucks, trailers, or tracked vehicles and not secured to (tied down in) the carrying vehicle. The test severity is not tailorable, and represents loose cargo transport in military vehicles traversing rough terrain.

Procedure III - Large Assembly Transportation

This procedure is intended to replicate the vibration and shock environment incurred by large assemblies of materiel installed or transported by wheeled or tracked vehicles. It is applicable to large assemblies or groupings forming a high proportion of vehicle mass, and to materiel forming an integral part of the vehicle. In this procedure, use the specified vehicle type to provide the mechanical excitation to the test materiel. The vehicle is driven over surfaces representative of service conditions, resulting in realistic simulation of both the vibration environment and the dynamic response of the test materiel to the environment. Generally, measured vibration data are not used to define this test. However, measured data are often acquired during this test to verify that vibration and shock criteria for materiel subassemblies are realistic.


Procedure IV - Assembled Aircraft Store Captive Carriage and Free Flight
Apply Procedure IV to fixed wing aircraft carriage and free flight portions of the environmental life cycles of all aircraft stores, and to the free flight phases of ground or sea-launched missiles. Use Procedure I, II, or III for other portions of the store’s life cycle as applicable. Steady state or transient vibration may be applied as appropriate. Do not apply Procedure I to fixed wing aircraft carriage or free flight phases.

METHOD 515.6
ACOUSTIC NOISE

The acoustic noise test is performed to determine the adequacy of materiel to resist the specified acoustic environment without unacceptable degradation of its functional performance and/or structural integrity.
1.2 Application:
This test is applicable to systems, sub-systems, and units, hereafter called materiel, that must function and/or survive in a severe acoustic noise environment. This test is also applicable for materiel located where acoustic noise excitation is used in combination with, or in preference to mechanical vibration excitation for the simulation of aerodynamic turbulence (Method 523.3).

Procedure I - Diffuse Field Acoustic Noise

Procedure I has a uniform intensity shaped spectrum of acoustic noise that impacts all the exposed materiel surfaces.

Procedure II - Grazing Incidence Acoustic Noise

Procedure II includes a high intensity, rapidly fluctuating acoustic noise with a shaped spectrum that impacts the materiel surfaces in a particular direction – generally along the long dimension of the materiel.

Procedure III - Cavity Resonance Acoustic Noise

In Procedure III, the intensity and, to a great extent, the frequency content of the acoustic noise spectrum is governed by the relationship between the geometrical configuration of the cavity and the materiel within the cavity.

METHOD 516.6
SHOCK

Shock tests are performed to:
a.Provide a degree of confidence that materiel can physically and functionally withstand the relatively infrequent, non-repetitive shocks encountered in handling, transportation, and service environments. This may include an assessment of the overall materiel system integrity for safety purposes in any one or all of the handling, transportation, and service environments;
b.Determine the materiel's fragility level, in order that packaging may be designed to protect the materiel's physical and functional integrity; and
c.Test the strength of devices that attach materiel to platforms that can crash.

Procedure I - Functional Shock

Procedure I is intended to test materiel (including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and electronic) in its functional mode and to assess the physical integrity, continuity and functionality of the materiel to shock. In general, the materiel is required to function during the shock and to survive without damage to shocks representative of those that may be encountered during operational service.

Procedure II - Materiel to be packaged

Procedure II is to be used when materiel will require a shipping container. It specifies a minimum critical shock resistance level to a handling drop height. The shock definition may be furnished to a package designer as a design criterion. This procedure is not intended for the test of extremely fragile materiel, e.g., missile guidance systems, precision-aligned test equipment, gyros, inertial guidance platforms, etc. For extremely fragile materiel where quantification of shock resistance is required, consider Procedure III. See paragraph 2.3 below for processing techniques useful in expressing shock resistance criteria.

Procedure III – Fragility

Procedure III is used to determine a materiel’s ruggedness or fragility so that packaging can be designed for the materiel, or so the materiel can be redesigned to meet transportation and/or handling requirements. This procedure is used to determine the critical shock conditions at which there is reasonable chance of structural and/or functional system degradation. To achieve the most realistic criteria, perform the procedure at environmental temperature extremes. See paragraph 2.3 below for processing techniques useful in expressing shock fragility criteria.

Procedure IV - Transit Drop

Procedure IV is intended for materiel either outside of or within its transit or combination case, or as prepared for field use (carried to a combat situation by man, truck, rail, etc.). This procedure is used to determine if the materiel is capable of withstanding the shocks normally induced by loading and unloading when it is (1) outside of its transit or combination case, e.g., during routine maintenance, when being removed from a rack, being placed in its transit case, etc., or (2) inside its transit or combination case. Such shocks are accidental, but may impair the functioning of the materiel. This procedure is not intended for shocks encountered in a normal logistic environment as experienced by materiel inside shipping containers (see Procedure II (Materiel to be Packaged) and Procedure VII (Pendulum Impact).


Procedure V - Crash Hazard Shock Test
Procedure V is for materiel mounted in air or ground vehicles that could break loose from its mounts, tiedowns or containment configuration during a crash and present a hazard to vehicle occupants and bystanders. This procedure is intended to verify the structural integrity of materiel mounts, tiedowns or containment configuration during simulated crash conditions. Use the test to verify the overall structural integrity of the materiel, i.e., parts of the materiel are not ejected under the shock. This procedure is not intended for materiel transported as cargo for which Method 513.6, Acceleration, or Method 514.6, Vibration, could be applied. The crash hazard can be evaluated by a static acceleration test (Method 513 Procedure III) and/or a transient shock (Method 516 Procedure V). The requirement for one or both procedures must be evaluated based on the test item.

Procedure VI - Bench Handling

Procedure VI is intended for materiel that may typically experience bench handling, bench maintenance, or packaging. It is used to determine the ability of the materiel to withstand representative levels of shock encountered during typical bench handling, bench maintenance, or packaging. Such shocks might occur during materiel repair. This procedure may include testing for materiel with protrusions that may be easily damaged without regard to gross shock on the total materiel. The nature of such testing is highly specialized and must be performed on a case-by-case basis, noting the configuration of the materiel protrusions and the case scenarios for damage during such activities as bench handling, maintenance, and packaging. This procedure is appropriate for medium-to-large test materiel out of its transit or combination case that has a maximum dimension greater than approximately 23 cm (9 inches). Small materiel systems, in general, will be tested to higher levels during Procedure IV, Transit Drop.

Procedure VII - Pendulum Impact

Procedure VII is intended to test the ability of large shipping containers to resist horizontal impacts, and to determine the ability of the packaging and packing methods to provide protection to the contents when the container is impacted. This test is meant to simulate accidental handling impacts, and is used only on containers that are susceptible to accidental end impacts. The pendulum impact test is designed specifically for large and/or heavy shipping containers that are likely to be handled mechanically rather than manually.

Procedure VIII - Catapult Launch/Arrested Landing

Procedure VIII is intended for materiel mounted in or on fixed-wing aircraft that are subject to catapult launches and arrested landings. For catapult launch, materiel may experience a combination of initial shock followed by a low level transient vibration of some duration having frequency components in the neighborhood of the mounting platform’s lowest frequencies, and concluded by a final shock according to the catapult event sequence. For arrested landing, materiel may experience an initial shock followed by a low level transient vibration of some duration having frequency components in the neighborhood of the mounting platform’s lowest frequencies.

METHOD 517.1 PYROSHOCK

Pyroshock tests involving pyrotechnic (explosive- or propellant-activated) devices are performed to:
a.provide a degree of confidence that materiel can structurally and functionally withstand the infrequent shock effects caused by the detonation of a pyrotechnic device on a structural configuration to which the materiel is mounted.
b.experimentally estimate the materiel's fragility level in relation to pyroshock in order that shock mitigation procedures may be employed to protect the materiel’s structural and functional integrity.

METHOD 518.1
ACIDIC ATMOSPHERE

Use the acidic atmosphere test to determine the resistance of materials and protective coatings to corrosive atmospheres, and when necessary, to determine its affect on operational capabilities.
1.2 Application.
Use this test method when the requirements documents state that the materiel is likely to be stored or operated in areas where acidic atmospheres exist, such as industrial areas or near the exhausts of any fuel-burning device.

METHOD 519.6
GUNFIRE SHOCK

Gunfire shock tests are performed to provide a degree of confidence that materiel can structurally and functionally withstand the relatively infrequent, short duration transient high rate repetitive shock input encountered in operational environments during the firing of guns.

METHOD 520.3 TEMPERATURE, HUMIDITY, VIBRATION AND ALTITUDE

The purpose of this test is to help determine the combined effects of temperature, humidity, vibration, and altitude on airborne electronic and electro-mechanical materiel with regard to safety, integrity, and performance during ground and flight operations. Some portions of this test may apply to ground vehicles, as well. In such cases, references to altitude considerations do not apply.

METHOD 521.3 ICING/FREEZING RAIN

The icing test is conducted to evaluate the effect of icing on the operational capability of materiel. This method also provides tests for evaluating the effectiveness of de-icing equipment and techniques, including prescribed means to be used in the field.
1.2 Application.
a.Use this method to evaluate materiel that may be exposed to icing such as produced by freezing rain or freezing drizzle.
b.Use this method to develop ice accretion from sea splash or spray but the ice thicknesses may need to be modified to reflect the lower density of the ice.

METHOD 522.1
BALLISTIC SHOCK

This method includes a set of ballistic shock tests generally involving momentum exchange between two or more bodies, or momentum exchange between a liquid or gas and a solid performed to:
a.provide a degree of confidence that materiel can structurally and functionally withstand the infrequent shock effects caused by high levels of momentum exchange on a structural configuration to which the materiel is mounted.
b.experimentally estimate the materiel's fragility level relative to ballistic shock in order that shock mitigation procedures may be employed to protect the materiel’s structural and functional integrity.

METHOD 523.3
VIBRO-COUSTIC/
TEMPERATURE

The vibro-acoustic/temperature procedure is performed to determine the synergistic effects of vibration, acoustic noise, and temperature on externally carried aircraft stores during captive carry flight. Such determination may be useful for, but not restricted to the following purposes:
a.To reveal and correct design weaknesses (Test, Analyze and Fix (TAAF) test).
b.To determine whether a design meets a specified reliability requirement (Reliability Demonstration test).
c.To reveal workmanship or component defects before a production unit leaves the place of assembly (Screening test).
d.To estimate the Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of a lot of units based upon the test item’s time to failure of a small sample of the units (Lot Acceptance test).
e.To determine the relative reliability among units based upon the test item’s time to failure of a small sample of the units (Source Comparison test).